Portland in Transition

ArchitecturalStyles.jpg
ArchitecturalStyles.jpg

Portland in Transition

95.00

Our architectural past, present and future

Once again our urban landscape is in a period of great transition. Acquire the tools to talk about our architectural past and identify the styles which define it. Explore the urban environment and forensically examine its history from the 19th century to the present. Includes walking tour.

Register Now

*Tuesdays, January 17, 22, 24, + 31st || 6:00-7:30 pm
Location || Taborspace, 5441 Belmont Street
Four weeks, $95 || Space is limited to 25 students || Scholarships available.
*2nd session is a walking tour downtown on Sunday, January 22nd 10am-12pm

Once again our urban landscape is in a period of great transition. Acquire the tools to talk about our architectural past and identify the styles which define it. Explore the urban environment and forensically examine its history. Discuss examples of old and contemporary buildings. Share your thoughts and opinions about them, and hear what others have to say.

Week 1: 19th Century

The 19th Century was a period of great architectural eclecticism and Portland contains many fine examples of the styles which defined it. Learn the differences between Federalism, Italianate, Romanesque Revival and American Classical Revival.

Week 2: Walking Tour

Peel back the onion layers of time as we forensically examine the construction methods and materials of the past on a walking tour of downtown architectural history.

Week 3: 20th Century

The mid 20th Century found Portland, for the first time, at the vanguard of American and International architecture. Learn about the Mid Century Modern architects who, perhaps more than anyone, shaped the Portland we see today.

Week 4: Student Reflections

For our round table on Portland architecture students will provide examples of buildings past or present which they like and dislike. We will share our thoughts and observations as we discuss the future of the urban landscape. Remember, there is no wrong answer to the question "do you like this building?"


John Doyle has an M.A. in Art History from Tufts University and is a former Education Department lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.